Kezdőlap Újdonságok Kereső Egyesület Fórumok Aktualitások Kutatás Adattárak Történetek Fotógaléria Partnereink RSS
RSS hírcsatornák
Ancestor.com
Ancestry.com
AustraliaGenWeb
Computergenealogie
FamilySearch.org
Forum zur Ahnenfors...
Genealogy Gems
Genealogy News Center
GenealogyBlog
GeneaNet.org
Hungaricana - Magya...
Interment.net Cemet...
LegacyTree.com
Louis Kessler's Beh...
Mac Genealogy Softw...
Magyar Országos Lev...
MyHeritage.com
NYT > Genealogy
Országos Széchényi ...
The Genealogue

GenealogyBlog

The free daily online genealogy nautamagazine

Irish Research Guide Sale: Up to 70% Off

2020. december 2., szerda 0:41:42

Family Roots Publishing is running an Irish Research Guide promotion. We market over 30 different guides, and have placed them all on sale for the 2020 holiday. Click on the links for full information on each book.

IMPORTANT IRISH GUIDES

Irish Flyleaf Press books – 15% Off

Heritage Productions Books – Imported from Ontario, Canada – 10% Off. Note that we have limited numbers of each of these popular books. If we run out, it can take up to 2 weeks to get restocked. If we are out, we will attempt to get it so-marked at the webpage for the item.

Mobile Genealogy: How to Use Your Tablet and Smartphone for Family History Research – 50% Off

2020. december 1., kedd 21:08:20

Mobile_Gen_COVER-275pw

We are running a holiday promotion on Mobile Genealogy and are offering the popular book to our readers for under $10! That’s now 50% off, and is the lowest price we’ve offered on the volume. Click on the links to order.

Family Roots Publishing is offering Mobile Genealogy: How to Use Your Tablet and Smartphone for Family History Research for 50% off – the lowest price we’ve ever offered. We have lots of copies in stock, ready to ship immediately. Order Mobile Genealogy: How to Use Your Tablet and Smartphone for Family History Research; by Lisa Louise Cooke; iv+170 pp; Paper; 6×9, Published: 2016; ISBN: 5800114346248 Item # LU20. Regular: $19.95; On Sale for just $9.98. Click on the links to order.

Access the Computer On Your Desk at Home!
Chapter 15 covers using your mobile device to access your home computer. I’ll bet most of you never even considered connecting to your PC with your smart phone. Yes – it’s possible, and Lisa gives step-by-step instructions on how to do that too! So – whether you are using a tablet, or a smart phone, you can access stuff that’s 1000 miles away – or maybe just around the corner.

Screen Capture on my Smart Phone?!
Chapter 4 really gets into the nitty-gritty of better browsing with your mobile device. Her section on mobile web-clipping and screen capture was a great help to me. I’ve always had problems with screen capture and had basically given up on it. Now I know what to do!

Translation Strategies
Lisa’s section on translation strategies in Chapter 10 just opened up a world of new data for me – and it can for you. She explains how the Google Translate App from the App Store or Google Play can be used for capturing data on your ancestor from foreign-language books – translated into English so you can actually read it! Yes – we all know the shortcomings of translation programs, but I am happy to accept anything dealing with my ancestors, and the towns they lived in, even if the English is a bit messy. Think Google Books here folks – loaded with stuff on our ancestors, much of which we can’t read! You can even use your phone’s camera to capture, OCR, and translate any words or phrases! Lisa takes the reader step-by step through how to use the marvelous technology that’s resting in your hand!

Following is an expanded Table of Contents for the volume.

INTRODUCTION

  • A Few Tips for Using the Book

PART ONE: GETTING STARTED

  • Chapter One: The Tablet Mindset
    • Tablet Mindset Guidelines
    • App Consolidation
  • Chapter Two: Genealogy Task Wish List

PART TWO: APPS

  • Chapter 3: There’s An App for That!
    • App Store
    • Google Play Store
    • Staying Up to Date – App Resources
  • Chapter 4: Browsing
    • Safari
    • Chrome
    • Google
    • Dolphin
  • Chapter 5: Note Taking
    • Evernote
    • Notes
    • Pages
    • Microsoft Word
    • Google Docs
  • Chapter 6: File Storage & Management
    • Dropbox
    • Google Drive
    • iCloud
  • Chapter 7: Audio
    • Memos
    • Evernote
  • Chapter 8: Photos
    • Capturing Photos
    • Photomyne Pro – Album Scanner
    • Storing and Organizing Photos
    • iCloud Photo Library
    • Google Photos
    • Working with Photos
    • Adobe Photoshop Express
    • Color Splash for iPad
    • Android Alternative to Color Splash for iPad: Color Splash FX
    • Retype
    • Pocketbooth
  • Chapter 9: Reading
    • Reading Content from the Web
    • Flipboard
    • Feedly
    • Reading eBooks and Documents
    • GoodReader
    • Play Books
    • iBooks
  • Chapter 10: Collaboration & Communication
    • Facebook
    • Skype
    • FaceTime
    • Google Translate
  • Chapter 11: Travel
  • Chapter 12: Genealogy
    • Ancestry
    • MyHeritage
    • Reunion for iPad
    • RootsMagic
    • Families
    • Family Tree
    • FamilySearch Memories
  • Chapter 13: Education & Information
    • Podcasts (Audio)
    • Genealogy Gems
    • Video
  • Chapter 14: Captivating Non-Genealogists
    • Pic Collage
    • Google Earth
    • Pinterest
    • THIS DAY in My Family History
    • Little Family Tree

PART THREE: BECOME A POWER USER

    • Chapter 15: Power Boost Your Tablet: Remote Access
      • Chrome Remote Desktop
    • Chapter 16: Mobile Tips & Tricks
      • New Features
      • Keyboard and Gesture Tips and Tricks
      • Navigation Tips and Tricks
      • Voice Command
      • Functionality Tips and Tricks
      • App Related Tips and Tricks

PART FOUR: CONCLUSION

  • Chapter 17: Mobile Genealogy Means Adventurous Genealogy
  • About the Author

Family Roots Publishing is offering Mobile Genealogy: How to Use Your Tablet and Smartphone for Family History Research for 50% off. Order Mobile Genealogy: How to Use Your Tablet and Smartphone for Family History Research; by Lisa Louise Cooke; iv+170 pp; Paper; 6×9, Published: 2016; ISBN: 5800114346248 Item # LU20. Regular: $19.95; On Sale for just $9.98 Click on the links to order.

Indiana Research Guide & Source Book Sale – 15-90% Off

2020. december 1., kedd 20:54:22

Got Indiana Family? Now is your chance to take advantage of some terrific deals on over 30 Indiana-related research guides and source books.

All these volumes are now discounted from 15 to 90% off. If items run out, we will clearly mark it as such at the website. However, since we aren’t always at the computer (especially on the weekends), some items might run out without our knowledge. If this happens, we will either reverse or refund the charges for credit card sales that came in after the item might have sold out. We will do all we can to stay on top of it however.

2020 Holiday Indiana Research Guide Sale

IHS001-100p
15% OFF

NEW: Historic German Newspapers Online – Second Edition – 15% Off

2020. november 30., hétfő 0:00:50

The Second Edition of Historic German Newspapers Online has been in print for two years, but I’ve never written about it before. In fact, I bought copies of it for resale when it came out, put them on the shelf, and promptly forgot to post them. While pulling an item in the stockroom this morning, I happened to spot them, wondered why I had so many, and upon checking found I hadn’t ever posted the book to our website. Oh, well. At least I got some use out of the book I’d pulled for myself! So… I’m adding the volume to our holiday sale. 15% off (reg. $35) – just $29.75. Click on the links or illustration to order.

Historic German Newspapers Online – Second Edition; by Ernest Thode; 2018; 329 pp; 6×9; Soft Cover; Perfect Bound; ISBN: 9780806320922 Item # GPC5760.

Your German genealogy research will not be complete until you have thoroughly examined all of the resources available–and that includes a search of German-language newspapers. Astonishingly, there are more than 2,000 historic German-language newspapers online at numerous public, private, and commercial websites. The combined newspapers comprise billions of pages and refer to millions of individuals. This book will help you discover all digitally available German-language newspapers 50 years or older, search them by location and title, and narrow down the dates for which they are available online. The genealogical information you can find in these newspapers is almost limitless. It includes notices of births, marriages, and deaths from civil registrations; baptisms and wedding announcements from churches; intentions to emigrate; trade news; lists of pupils; appointments to office; promotions, transfers, and retirements; deaths and estate sales; lists of hotel guests; and a multitude of everyday notices.

Since the first edition of this book was published in 2014, a great many more historic German newspapers have been digitized, prompting the need for this enlarged second edition, which is nearly 100 pages longer than the previous edition. The book’s coverage is quite literally worldwide. Of course, by far the largest number of German-language newspapers online are from Germany, followed by Austria, then present-day Poland. But more than two dozen other countries throughout the world are represented, including Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, Czech Republic, Egypt, Estonia, France, Georgia (country), Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Mexico, Norway, Paraguay, Russia, Samoa, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Switzerland, Tanzania, Turkey, Ukraine, and the United States.

To use this book, first go to the Places section, look up your locality of interest or the largest nearby city, and note the title of the paper and the years covered. In non-German countries, look for large cities or capital cities. Next, go to the Titles section, noting the abbreviation for the URL (website) where it is located. Then click on the Key to URLs section and go to the website corresponding to the abbreviation you found.

Whether you are a genealogist, family historian, demographer, migration researcher, or social historian, you’ll find that these newspapers are extremely useful resources.

Miller, Wagner, Hoffman, Bauer, & Becker Heraldry and Genealogy Volumes – 25% off!

2020. november 29., vasárnap 22:22:43

Over the last several years, Family Publishing has produced five books dealing with the intersection of German genealogy and heraldry. All these volumes are written from a geographical point of view. We’ve covered five of the most popular Germanic names, those of Miller, Wagner, Hoffman, Bauer, and Becker.

We are offering the volumes for 25% off. Prices are good through Tuesday, November 2. Click on the links for a full description of each book.

The five volumes are:
Muller/Mueller Heraldry and Genealogy: A Geographical Perspective
Wagner Heraldry and Genealogy: A Geographical Perspective
Hoffmann Heraldry and Genealogy: A Geographical Perspective
Bauer/Baur Heraldry and Genealogy: A Geographical Perspective
Becker/Beckher Heraldry and Genealogy: A Geographical Perspective

German heraldry is unlike British heraldry where a coat-of-arms is associated with one person. Siler’s books include arms that originated as house marks, guild marks, and burgher arms that have been used by families for centuries. Also included are noble armorial bearings that have been granted to the children of an individual and have been passed down through descendants.

It should be noted that these volumes are heavily footnoted, allowing the researcher to locate and examine the original source materials from which the author drew his information. An amazing place index is found at the rear of the books, allowing genealogists to often associate a specific place with the families. It is the author’s belief that there is often a coat of arms that may be associated with one’s European ancestor. It may not be that of a direct ancestor or that of one’s ancestral family, but it could well be linked, if only by the proximity of geographical location.

Click on the links or illustration for more information and/or to order.

Stories From My Grandparent – 20% Off for the Holiday – While Stocks Last

2020. november 29., vasárnap 22:20:39

fnw10There are more than a few books on the market to help people capture living stories. Usually, these books focus on common questions, such as who was your best friend in grade school or how did you meet your spouse? These books come in all different shapes and size. Some focus on telling our own stories and others on gathering the stories of our living relatives. Some focus more on the genealogies we posses and others on a collection of life stories. Each has a purpose meant to inspire and assist in capturing those stories. This book was inspired by grandparents, Stories from my Grandparent: An Heirloom Journal for Your Grandchild.

The book is being offered for just $15.19, while stocks last.

One thing I really enjoyed is how the author didn’t just ask the usual questions. Instead, Susan Adcox tried to make the question more interesting. Instead of what is your favorite or least favorite food, Adcox coaches the Grandparent to fill in the space provide with a prompt like,”Children were commonly expected to clean their plates, which could be a problem for me when these foods were on my plate.” Here are a few more examples:

  • “In our classroom, we had real chalkboards. We had spelling bees and go-to-the-board drills, but no computers. Here’ what I remember about my first classroom and how we learned.”
  • “One year I received a birthday present that I’ll never forget:
  • “I learned a lot about myself the first time I lived on my own, away form my family”

Perhaps one of greatest advantages this book has over others is its thoughtful binding. The book was bound hardback but with a metal comb binding on the inside. This means the book will sit nicely on a shelf yet is very easy to open and write in.

This book really tries to make the storytelling process as easy and fun as possible.

Copies of Stories from my Grandparent: An Heirloom Journal for Your Grandchild. are all available for all grandparents from Family Roots Publishing.

Irish Research Guide & 1849-50 Irish Immigrants Bundle – 70% Off – Only $21.27

2020. november 29., vasárnap 21:11:41

We have enormous stocks of two popular Irish research books, and have decided to add them to our Holiday sale. We made up a bundle of the two volumes, and discounted it 70% off the normal MSRP – making the price just $21.27 (reg. $70.90).

Click here to order the bundle.

This bundle is made up of the following two popular Irish research guides:

Click on the links to check out each item – including the full surname index for The Famine Immigrants [Vol. V]. Use your back arrow to return to this page to purchase the bundle.

Don’t need both books? You may purchase Tracing Your Ancestors – Irish Research for 35% off at it’s own web page or The Famine Immigrants [Vol. V] at 65% off at its page.

Following are reviews of each of the two books.

The Famine Immigrants [Vol. V], Lists of Irish Immigrants Arriving at the Port of New York, 1846-1851: October 1849-May 1850

Very limited numbers of this hardback volume are available. This is the only volume of the series still available in the hardback printing. The book is available from the publisher in soft cover only, currently also selling for $60.95.

The blight that struck the Irish potato crop in the winter of 1845-46 brought ruin to tens of thousands of tenant farmers and laborers, reducing almost all of Ireland to poverty. Making matters worse, very few farmers owned their own land or even held title to their humble dwellings, so when the crop failed they had scarcely any resources to call on. As a result, countless people faced the choice of leaving Ireland or perishing. In fact, between 1846 and 1851, more than a million men, women, and children emigrated to the United States and Canada, mostly through the port of New York.

The information on these people exists in an invaluable series of port arrival records, the Customs Passenger Lists. Until recently, however, these passenger lists were unpublished and only partially indexed and lay well out of the reach of the average researcher, the more so since they are not classified by nationality. To bring those records dealing with Irish immigrants within the range of the researcher, The Famine Immigrants series was conceived for the purpose of enumerating all Irish passengers who entered the port of New York between 1846 and 1851. There are seven volumes in this series.

The passenger lists found in The Famine Immigrants are arranged by ship and date of arrival in New York, and each person is identified with respect to age, sex, occupation, and family relationships where such was indicated in the original manifests. Additionally, every volume boasts of an extensive index containing all of the passenger names in the text.

In the period covered in this volume, October 1849-May 1850, about 60,000 Irish men, women, and children arrived in New York, and all of the data located on them is provided, and their names are all indexed.

The Famine Immigrants [Vol. V], Lists of Irish Immigrants Arriving at the Port of New York, 1846-1851: October 1849-May 1850; by Ira A. Glazier and Michael H. Tepper, eds; 638 pp.; Hardcover; Published: 1985; ISBN: 9780806311234; Item # CF2215

The following 11,520 Surnames are found within this volume:

  • Abba
  • Abbot
  • Abbott
  • Abernathu
  • Abernethy

See the full surname index for the volume at: http://www.familyrootspublishing.com/store/product_view.php?id=2326

Tracing Your Ancestors – Irish Research: A Practical Guide, by Dr. Maurice Gleeson, MB

Moorshead Magazines has published another excellent guide for genealogists. This guide is entitled Tracing Your Ancestors: Irish Research – A Practical Guide. Written by Dr. Maurice Gleeson (author of DNA & Your Genealogy), the 66-page booklet lays out how to do your Irish research – using the latest resources and techniques. Anyone with Irish ancestors will find it extremely useful.

On sale for 35% off. Click on the link or on the illustration to order.

The following is from the Table of Contents:

Why You Need This Guide

  • Everything is Changing so Quickly
  • How Far Will You Be Able to Go Back?
  • What Records Are Available?
  • What Resources Will You be Using?
  • What Challenges Will You Face?
  • The DNA Revolution
  • Crowd-Source Your Family Tree

Where in Ireland Did They Come From?

  • A Brief History of Irish Emigration
  • General Techniques for Tracing Your Ancestor
  • Genealogical Records for US Immigrants
  • Genealogical Records for Canadian Immigrants
  • Genealogical Records for Australian Immigrants

Strategic Approach to Finding Records

  • What Was Lost in the Fire – And What Wasn’t
  • Irish Land Divisions
  • Irish Place Names

Census Records – All Free Online

  • A Brief History
  • What Parts of Ireland Do Surviving Census Records Cover?
  • What Information Do They Contain?
  • How to Use the Records
  • Hints and Tips
  • Other Sources for Surveys, Censuses & Census Substitutes

Civil Registration Records – Now Free Online

  • A Brief History
  • What Information Do They Contain?
  • Where Can I Find Them?
  • Hints and Tips

Church Records – Many Online, Many Free

  • A Brief Overview
  • What Information Do They Contain?
  • How to Use the Records
  • Other Additional Resources
  • Hints and Tips

Gravestones & Burial Records

  • Ireland Specific Websites
  • Global Websites

Land, Streets, Schools & Workhouses

  • Griffith’s Valuation – What Came After and Before It
  • Other Land Records Collections
  • Street Directories
  • School Registers
  • Workhouse Records

Wills & Probate

Newspapers

Court Records

DNA Testing As an Additional Tool

  • The Basics of DNA Testing
  • Characterizing Your Brick Walls
  • Collaborating With Your Genetic Cousins
  • Triangulation
  • Y-DNA, Your Surname, and Your Clan

Tracing Your Ancestors: Irish Research – A Practical Guide; By Dr. Maurice Gleeson, MB; 2018; 66pp; 8.5×11; Saddle-Stappled; ISBN: 978-1-926510-09-5; Item #: M0029

Surviving Mother Nature’s Tests: The Effects Climate Change and Other Natural Phenomena have had on the lives of our Ancestors – 25% Off Through Dec. 2, 2020

2020. november 28., szombat 1:13:26

Surviving Mother Nature’s Tests: The Effects Climate Change and Other Natural Phenomena have had on the lives of our Ancestors – 20% Off Through Dec. 2, 2020. 

In 2018, Wayne Shepheard wrote a new book on how climate change has influenced our ancestor’s lives. It was published in Australia. His examples found in the volume are from the British Isles. FRPC is now printing the volume in a perfect-bound edition, and distributed it in the United States. The 182 page volume sells for just $29.95. However, it’s now on sale for 25% Off – making it just $22.46. The sale ends December2, 2020.

Surviving Mother Nature’s Tests: The Effects Climate Change and Other Natural Phenomena have had on the lives of our Ancestors; by W. Wayne Shepheard; 2018; 182 pp; 8.5×11; maps, tables, index; ISBN: 9781925781465; Item #: UTPM004

‘Surviving Mother Nature’s Tests’ directly relates many of the situations observed in nature to the lives of families who experienced or endured them, primarily over the past several centuries. Family historians will appreciate that natural events had wide-ranging effects on generations of people – especially in consideration of how people sought to obtain the basic necessities of food, shelter and employment – as well as influencing changes to political, economic and societal situations.

Information presented here will also be of interest to those who want an introduction to the causes and effects of climate change and its impact on the environment and human habitats of the past.

The book summarizes different natural phenomena, the time periods in which they occurred and explanations of how people survived the particular tests imposed on them by Mother Nature. Among these are:

  • Climate change – what controls global changes
  • Epochal changes – how gradual altering of physical environments and human habitats occurring over generations affected living conditions and societal history
  • The Holocene epoch – brief summaries of human and natural history of the last 10,000 years illustrating the frequency of alternating warm and cold periods and the commonality of the effects on societies
  • The Last Millennium – natural conditions during the last 1,000 years with an emphasis on the effects on people, communities and social systems
  • Slow-Developing Events – how such events as drought and famine, erosion of coastal margins, infilling of estuaries, shifts in river courses and volcanic activity affected living conditions and economies
  • Rapidly-Materializing Incidents – impacts on people and communities from disease, earthquakes, floods and storms

Table of Contents

  • Illustrations
    • Introduction
    • The Parameters of Climate Change
      • Determining Whether Climate has Changed
      • Controls on Climate
      • Pre-Holocene Warm and Cold Periods
    • Epochal Changes: The Holocene
      • Warm and Cold Periods of the Holocene
      • The Rise and Fall of Civilizations
      • Summary
    • The Last Millennium
      • Medieval Warm Period
      • Little Ice Age
      • Changed Farming Methods
      • Enclosure
      • Land Abandonment
      • The Age of Enlightenment
      • The Industrial Revolution
      • Modern Warm Period
      • Summary
    • Slow-Developing Events
      • Rivers and Estuaries
        • River Bolin, Cheshire
        • River Trent, Derbyshire, Leicestershire, Nottinghamshire, Lincolnshire, Yorkshire
        • Humber Estuary, Lincolnshire, Yorkshire
      • Shoreline Processes
        • Culbin Foreland and Findhorn Estuary, Morayshire, Nairnshire
        • Firvie, Aberdeenshire
        • Holderness, East Yorkshire
        • The Broads, Norfolk, Suffolk
        • Dunwich, Suffolk
        • Romney Marsh, Dungeness Foreland, Kent, Sussex
        • Hallsands, Devon
        • Kenfig, Bridgend
        • Morfa Harlech, Gwynedd
      • Drought
        • 1540 Drought in Europe
        • 1887-1910 The Long Drought
      • Famine
        • 1315-1317 Great Famine
        • 1623 Uplands Famine
        • 1740-1741 Irish Famine ‘Year of the Slaughter’
        • 1845-1852 Irish Potato Famine
      • Volcanic Eruptions
        • 1258 Indonesia
        • 1783 Laki
        • 1815 Tambora
        • 1883 Krakatau
      • Summary
    • Rapidly-Developing Events
      • Major Storms
        • 1287 South England Storms: Kent, Norfolk and Sussex
        • 1638 Lightning Strike: Widecombe, Devon
        • 1694 Culbin Sands Disaster: Morayshire and Nairnshire
        • 1703 The Great Storm: Southern England
        • 1824 The Great Gale: Cornwall to Sussex
        • 1839 Night of the Big Wind
        • 1848 Moray Firth
        • 1881 Eyemouth Disaster
      • Floods
        • 1607 Bristol, Channel Flood
        • 1771 Tyne, Tees, Wear and Eden Rivers Flood
        • 1852 Oxford (Duke of Wellington) Flood
        • 1866 Pennine Flood
        • 1920 Louth Flood
        • 1953 North Sea Flood
      • Earthquakes and Landslides
        • 1771 Solway Moss Irruption
        • 1839 Bindon, Dorset
        • 1884 Colchester Earthquake
      • Diseases and Epidemics
        • 1347-1351 Black Death
        • 1665-1666 Great Plague
        • 1831-1866 Cholera Epidemics
        • 1918 Influenza Pandemic
      • Fire
      • Summary
    • Genealogical Information
      • Information from Parish Registers
      • Other Information Available in Historical Records
      • Summary
    • Summary and Conclusions
    • References
  • Index

Surviving Mother Nature’s Tests: The Effects Climate Change and Other Natural Phenomena have had on the lives of our Ancestors; by W. Wayne Shepheard; 2018; 182 pp; 8.5×11; maps, tables, index; ISBN: 9781925781465; Item #: UTPM004

German Residential Records For Genealogists: Tracing Your Ancestor From Place to Place in Germany – 25% Off

2020. november 27., péntek 22:50:37

Sometime before the completion of Dr. Roger Minert’s 2016 book, German Census Records, 1816-1916, he found himself studying one of the best examples of residential registration he had found in four decades of Germanic family history research. The page established for Theresia Baumgärtner, who arrived in Würzburg from München in 1889, is replete with details about her partner and their illegitimate children. Roger began to research the origins of the practice of documenting strangers and foreigners in Germany – finding that the practice was used all over Germany – and goes back for centuries in some areas. Thus this book, German Residential Records For Genealogists: Tracing Your Ancestor From Place to Place in Germany, was conceived.

German residential records are found in archives all over Germany, and yes – many have been microfilmed and are available through the Family History Library.

The study, and subsequent book identifies the registration of foreigners (Fremdenmeldung) in every German state early in the nineteenth century. Specific laws have been located in every one of the states existing after the withdrawal of French occupation forces by 1815 and the conclusion of the Congress of Vienna that same year, where many German state borders were re-drawn. In many cases, the earliest laws refer to decrees issued at previous times. As the leading member state of the North German League, the kingdom of Prussia was instrumental in the enactment of laws regarding mobility among German states. The Mobility Laws of 1867 provided that any citizen of any member state of the North German League (a majority of the German states at that time) had the right to move into any other member state, to purchase property, and to be employed or do business there. Any laws or rules regarding the registration of strangers enacted previously by member states were to remain in force.

This book, German state by German state, details the history of these records. Tremendous numbers of these records were made, in that residential registration is a fact of life in Germany, an idea that’s foreign to American researchers. The volume not only details the laws for each historic area of the Germany Empire, but includes examples, and state-by-state information on accessing these documents.

The book in soft and hard cover. FRPC is offering 25% off for the holidays. Order your soft cover copy by clicking on this link today. The volume is also available in hard cover.

German Residential Records For Genealogists: Tracing Your Ancestor From Place to Place in Germany; Roger P. Minert, Ph.D., A.G.; 2018; Soft Cover; 193 pp; 8.5×11; ISBN: 978-1-62859-214-6; Item #: FR0652.

The following is from the Table of Contents:

  • Acknowledgements
  • A History of Residential Registration in Germany
  • Chapter 1: Anhalt
  • Chapter 2: Baden
  • Chapter 3: Bayern (Bavaria)
  • Chapter 4: Brandenburg
  • Chapter 5: Braunschweig (Brunswick)
  • Chapter 6: Bremen (Hansestadt Bremen)
  • Chapter 7: Elsaß-Lothringen (Alsace-Lorraine)
  • Chapter 8: Hamburg (Hansestadt Hamburg)
  • Chapter 9: Hannover (Hanover)
  • Chapter 10: Hessen (Hesse)
  • Chapter 11: Hessen-Nassau (Hesse-Nassau)
  • Chapter 12: Hohenzollern
  • Chapter 13: Lippe
  • Chapter 14: Lübeck (Hansestadt Lübeck, Luebeck)
  • Chapter 15: Mecklenburg-Schwerin
  • Chapter 16: Mecklenburg-Strelitz
  • Chapter 17: Oldenburg
  • Chapter 18: Ostpreußen (East Prussia)
  • Chapter 19: Pommern (Pomerania)
  • Chapter 20: Posen
  • Chapter 21: Reuß älterer Linie (Reuss Elder Line)
  • Chapter 22: Reuß jüngerer Linie (Reuß Younger Line)
  • Chapter 23: Rheinprovinz (Rhineland Province)
  • Chapter 24: Sachsen-Altenburg (Saxe-Altenburg)
  • Chapter 25: Sachsen-Coburg-Gotha (Saxe-Coburg-Gotha)
  • Chapter 26: Königreich Sachsen (Kingdom of Saxony)
  • Chapter 27: Sachsen-Meiningen (Saxe-Meiningen)
  • Chapter 28: Provinz Sachsen (Province of Saxony)
  • Chapter 29: Sachsen-Weimar-Eisenach (Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach)
  • Chapter 30: Schaumburg-Lippe
  • Chapter 31: Schlesien (Silesia)
  • Chapter 32: Schleswig-Holstein
  • Chapter 33: Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt
  • Chapter 34: Schwarzburg-Sondershausen
  • Chapter 35: Waldeck
  • Chapter 36: Westfalen (Westphalia)
  • Chapter 37: Westpreußen (West Prussia)
  • Chapter 38: Württemberg (Wuerttemberg)
  • Appendix A: Writing to Archives in Germany, France, and Poland
  • Appendix B: Conducting Residential Research in Archives in Germany, France, and Poland
  • Appendix C: The States of the German Empire from 1871 to 1918
  • Appendix D: Glossary
  • Index
  • About the Author

Following are comments made about German Residential Records for Genealogists:

  • Wouldn’t you know! Roger P. Minert has pounced on still another German research topic. And he’s shared it with German family historians. We’ve known for a long time about the existence of these residential registration records, but we’ve not known much of anything about how to put those records to work in our own research. Now we can learn not only the background of these records – what this “signing in” and “signing out” business was all about through German centuries – but most important – now we can learn how to go about finding these ancestral “traveling around” records. When Minert recently found dramatic examples of these long-ago German “comings and goings” records, they lighted a spark in him that fired up this book.
    Shirley Riemer, author, and German genealogy research professional
  • Roger Minert has done it again! He has discovered yet another German record type that is universal, of utmost value to family historians, not widely recognized as a genealogical source, and has shown us how to use it. This time it is residential registrations. Minert describes the genesis of his book and the German legal basis behind such records, and he elucidates terms such as Polizei and Fremde and Heimat that can be misleading to Americans. Following the same format he successfully used in his groundbreaking German census book, German state by German state, he methodically spells out each state’s laws, provides sample record forms or records, and suggests how best to obtain records from archives. Hint: Local is best. I can vouch for the usefulness of this type of record. When I recently obtained my father’s citizenship file from USCIS, I was amazed to learn his place of residence every day from birth until his emigration from two jurisdictions in Schleswig-Holstein, including the exact dates when he went to work on my uncle’s farm in different years and when he came back to his parental home. Each local residential registration office keeps records of all arrivals and departures of everybody, and he needed to document his good standing with the residential policing authority in each place in order to get his visa to emigrate. Like German census records, residential registration records are underrepresented in FHL microfilm and internet sites and hardly ever used as a genealogical source even by Germans, partly because they are described by many dissimilar terms in different areas. But at least now we know how to look for them, thanks to Minert’s book.
    Ernie Thode – author, researcher, and lecturer in Germanic family history

About the Author
Roger P. Minert is a Nebraska native with ancestry in Hannover, Baden, Sachsen-Provinz, and Württemberg. He received his doctoral degree from the Ohio State University in German language history and second language acquisition theory. He taught German language and history for ten years, and then became a professional family history researcher. Accredited by the Family History Library for research in Germany and Austria, he has more than 38,000 hours of research experience. In August 2003, Dr. Minert became a professor of family history at Brigham Young University. The author of more than 150 books and articles, he is currently directing the research project “German Immigrants in American Church Records” that has already resulted in 25 large hard-bound volumes under this title. His next publication will be a book entitled “Austrian Family History Research: Sources and Methods.” He and his wife Jeanne have four daughters and 21 grandchildren.

The volume is also be available in a hard back edition.

German Residential Records For Genealogists: Tracing Your Ancestor From Place to Place in Germany; Roger P. Minert, Ph.D., A.G.; 2018; Soft Cover; 193 pp; 8.5×11; ISBN: 978-1-62859-214-6; Item #: FR0652.

Dollarhide’s Censuses & Substitute Name Lists Guides Series – 30% Off through December 2, 2020

2020. november 27., péntek 21:02:59

FRPC is offering the print edition volumes of Bill Dollarhide’s Censuses & Substitute Names List Volumes at 30% off Through December 2. AND buy the printed volume online and get the PDF eBook as an immediate download – and start researching instantly! The Printed Books (with free PDF eBook if ordering online) are just $13.27 each. This is the lowest price we’ve ever offered on these popular volumes. so order today!

To go to the Secure FRPC website and browse the list of all 52 Printed books, click here.

With this series of genealogical guides, William Dollarhide continues his long tradition of writing books that family historians find useful in their day-to-day United States research. Bill’s Censuses & Substitute Name List guides give a state-by-state listing of what censuses and substitute name lists are available, where to find them, and how they can be used to further one’s research.

Censuses & substitute name lists are key to success in any genealogical endeavor. Name lists, be they national, state, county, or even city or town in scope, can help nail down the precise place where one’s ancestor may have lived. And if that can be done, further records, usually found on a local level, will now be accessible to research. But success depends on knowing where the ancestor resided. This is where Dollarhide’s Censuses & Substitute Name List guides can make the difference.

Not only does each volume give a detailed bibliography of censuses & substitute name lists available for the state, but links to websites, FHL book & microfilm numbers, archive references, maps, and key historical information make this volume invaluable to the researcher looking to extend their lines and fill in the family tree.

The following guides, all written by William Dollarhide, may be purchased from Family Roots Publishing Co.:

Your DNA Guide – the book – by Diahan Southard – 15% off Through Dec. 2

2020. november 27., péntek 17:30:09

Diahan Southard has just written a totally unique guide for genealogists doing DNA research. Diahan is known for her expertise in speaking, guiding and writing about DNA. Family Roots Publishing has sold guides written by Diahan for years. Now she has written a new book that guides you step-by-step through the DNA research process. It’s totally amazing, and unlike anything else that’s ever been done on the subject. Published in late February, Family Roots Publishing again has a good stock of the volume, and can ship immediately.

The new book sells for $49.95. FRPC is discounting it by 15% through Dec. 2, making it $42.46 with FREE USA Shipping!

The following is from the web page for the book.

Your DNA Guide – the book – Step-by-Step plans to connect you with your family using your DNA; by Diahan Southard; 2020; full color throughout; 6×9; 238 pp+iv; ISBN: 978-1-7346139-0-2; Item # DS01

You don’t have to learn everything about genetic genealogy before asking specific questions of your DNA! That’s the premise of Diahan Southard’s brand new book, Your DNA Guide – the book.

DNA test results from AncestryDNA, 23andMe MyHeritage, and other companies can reveal more than ethnicity percentages. They may be key to finding your unknown relatives from biological parents to 2X great grandparents.

Your DNA Guide—the book takes you on a step-by-step journey of discovery, providing clear explanations to help you find answers. You’ll follow concrete plans, learning important DNA concepts–in plain English—as you go. Do you want to learn who your 2X great grandmother is? Turn to page 23. Do you want to know how you are related to one of your DNA matches? Page 37. As you proceed, you check your progress and get new guidance based on your specific results at each stage. (Including troubleshooting, like when your matches just aren’t responding or your great-grandparents turn out to be first cousins.)

This powerful, hands-on approach is based on Diahan’s 20 years of experience in the genetic genealogy industry and especially in the past five years, as she helps clients one-on-one make DNA discoveries. It became clear to her that while each client’s situation may be unique, there are patterns in how you can find solutions that you can apply yourself.

Your DNA Guide – the book is for anyone who has taken a DNA test and wants to learn more. It helps genealogists reconstruct family trees. It helps adoptees identify biological relatives. It can help you identify a specific DNA match. In short, it helps anyone explore what their DNA—and their DNA matches—can tell them about their origins.

The following is from the Table of Contents

Intro

  • Things you need to know
  • An overview
  • Family Tree
  • Ancestral ethnicity results
  • Staying Organized
  • Tips

Working Your Plan

  • The map
  • The basic process
  • Choose your research goal
  • Searching for biological parents
  • Searching for grandparents
  • Searching for greats
  • Searching for 2X greats
  • Searching for 3X greats
  • identifying a DNA match
  • Step-by-step plans

Learning Guides

  • Centimorgans: what you need to know
  • Cheating tools
  • Checking genetics vs. genealogy
  • Chromosome browsers
  • Communicating with your matches
  • Confirmation bias
  • Discovering close family relationships
  • Drawing on your match’s tree
  • Endogamy
  • Expanding your genetic network
  • Expanding your genetic network, part II
  • Family groups
  • Finding living people
  • Finding the generation of connection
  • Finding the generation of connection the hard way
  • Genealogy: building your own family tree
  • Genealogy: descendancy research
  • Genealogy: quick and simple tree
  • Generating trees for groups of DNA matches
  • Getting unstuck
  • Half relationships
  • Labeling matches
  • Match blocks
  • mtDNA basics
  • Pedigree collapse
  • Removed cousins
  • Research log
  • Segment size
  • Shared centimorgan project
  • Shared matches tool
  • Strategy: ask the wife
  • Strategy: bottoms up
  • Strategy: cousin categories
  • Strategy: leftovers
  • Targeted DNA testing
  • Tell your story
  • Unless
  • XDNA
  • YDNA basic
  • Glossary

Praise for Your DNA Guide – the book

“It’s definitely not a ‘big overview of DNA testing’ book, but instead a ‘let’s get down and dirty and solve a brickwall problem’ book. And we definitely need a book like this.” – Drew Smith, The Genealogy Guys Podcast and Genealogy Connection Podcast

“Diahan Southard is…funny and down to earth. Her presentations are always filled with color and graphics and explain the sometimes overwhelming topic in a simple and easy way to understand. She’s put her style into her first book on DNA.

This book is unique. My first thought was this is just like the choose your own adventure books I used to read as a kid. It’s almost like having Diahan there to hold your and while you work your way through your matches and find your family!” – Cheri Hudson Passey, Carolina Girl Genealogy

“There is a lot of information and it is a book that one would read over and over again! You have covered so many topics that will help [readers’] discover their DNA matches.” – Christine Ellin, everyday genealogist

“I love the format, the informal writing style, and wanted to let you know that it’s being well-studied!” – Ellen

Click on the link to order

Your DNA Guide – the book – Step-by-Step plans to connect you with your family using your DNA; by Diahan Southard; 2020; full color throughout; 6×9; 238 pp+iv; ISBN: 978-1-7346139-0-2; Item # DS01

The Census Book – 25% Off with a FREE PDF eBook @ the FRPC Website -Offer Ends December 2

2020. november 27., péntek 17:00:57

FRPC is offering currently offering The Census Book at 25% off and including a FREE immediately downloadable PDF eBook version of the soft and hardcover books. Click on the links to order. This offer is good through December 2, 2020.

Following a 20-year hiatus, William Dollarhide has again written the definitive guide to the United States Census. Written specifically for genealogists and family historians, this book details all the census schedules for 1790 through 1950. The first, and highly acclaimed Census Book was written in 1999. This all-new volume covers a lot of new ground that the earlier volume could not do. Read on for details.

Section 1 – Census Facts, Historical U.S. Censuses. This section includes many historical facts dealing with the United States Census. See the Table of Contents (below) to get a full overview of the section.

Section 2 – Population Schedules. Includes links to 630 websites, providing instant access to over 600 million indexed census records/names online. A table for each census year includes the starting FHL film roll number for each state’s population schedules, providing links to 580 FHL catalog webpages. It is the searchable roll number that gives a researcher quick access to the digital images of any census year, state, county, or town. Census substitutes have been added where available; U.S. maps of each census year are included; 1885; 1940 and 1950 census chapters are included in this edition.

Section 3 – Non-Population Schedules. This section identifies all non-population categories, with all-new statewide tables, Alabama to Wyoming, to 1935. URL links to 560 online databases. The location of the original Non-Population schedules is given, and the locations of microfilm copies features many direct links to a Family History Library online catalog webpage, in particular, those with digital images available.

Section 4 – Census Samples & Worksheets. The Census Book has 57 Samples and 42 Worksheets, including an 1890 Short Form; the 1940 Census; and the 1820, 1850, 1860, 1870, 1880, and 1885 Manufactures Schedules.

The book is available as a soft-bound volume; hard-bound volume and PDF eBook. FRPC is currently offering the book (in all forms) at 25% off at the FRPC website. Click on the links to order.

The Census Book: Facts, Schedules & Worksheets for the U.S. Federal Censuses;William Dollarhide, 2019, 245 pages; Color printing throughout; Tables; Website links.

See the “Inside the Book” pdf pages at the end of this post.

The following is extracted from the Table of Contents:

Introduction
Growth of the U.S. Federal Census
Section 1 – Census Facts

  • Historical U.S. Censuses
  • Early Census Takers
  • Censuses in U.S. Territories
  • Compensation to the Census Takers
  • The Census Day
  • Table 1: Census Year/Day/Time Allowed
  • Census Counting Machine
  • Early Census Losses
  • Table 2 – Statewide Census Losses
  • Census Copies, 1790-1820
  • Census Copies, 1830-1840
  • Census Copies, 1850-1870
  • Census Copies, 1880
  • 1880 Short Form
  • Census Copies, 1890
  • 1890 Short Form
  • 1890 Veterans Schedule
  • Copies/Microfilm/Digitizing, 1900-1940
  • Soundex Indexes, 1880-1930
  • Soundex Code
  • Personal Census Search
  • County Boundary Changes
  • Table 3: Statistics, 1790-1940 Censuses
  • References

Section 2 – Population Schedules
Contents – Section 2
Table 4: Availability of U.S. Federal Censuses, 1790-1950

  • First Census of the U.S. – 1790
  • Second Census of the U.S. – 1800
  • Third Census of the U.S. – 1810
  • Fourth Census of the U.S. – 1820
  • Fifth Census of the U.S. – 1830
  • Sixth Census of the U.S. – 1840
  • Seventh Census of the U.S. – 1850
  • Eighth Census of the U.S. – 1860
  • Ninth Census of the U.S. – 1870
  • Tenth Census of the U.S. – 1880
  • State Censuses Taken in 1885
  • Eleventh Census of the U.S. – 1890
  • Table 5 – 1884-1896 State Censuses
  • Twelfth Census of the U.S. – 1900
  • Thirteenth Census of the U.S. – 1910
  • Fourteenth Census of the U.S. – 1920
  • Fifteenth Census of the U.S. – 1930
  • Sixteenth Census of the U.S. – 1940
  • Seventeenth Census of the U.S. – 1950

Section 3 – Non-Population Schedules Contents – Section 3
Table 6: Availability of Non-Population Schedules
Descriptions of the Non-Population Schedules, 1820-1935
State Availability Tables:

  • Alabama
  • Alaska
  • American Samoa
  • Arizona
  • Arkansas
  • California
  • Colorado
  • Connecticut
  • Dakota Territory (1861-1889)
  • Delaware
  • District of Columbia
  • Florida
  • Georgia
  • Guam
  • Hawaii
  • Idaho
  • Illinois
  • Indiana
  • Iowa
  • Kansas
  • Kentucky
  • Louisiana
  • Maine
  • Maryland
  • Massachusetts
  • Michigan
  • Minnesota
  • Mississippi
  • Missouri
  • Montana
  • Nebraska
  • Nevada
  • New Hampshire
  • New Jersey
  • New Mexico
  • New York
  • North Carolina
  • North Dakota (1889-1935)
  • Ohio
  • Oklahoma
  • Oregon
  • Pennsylvania
  • Puerto Rico
  • Rhode Island
  • South Carolina
  • South Dakota (1889-1935)
  • Tennessee
  • Texas
  • Utah
  • Vermont
  • Virgin Islands of the U.S.
  • Virginia
  • Washington
  • West Virginia
  • Wisconsin
  • Wyoming

Section 4 – Census Samples & Worksheets
Contents – Section 4
Population Schedules:

  • 1790 Federal Census
  • 1800 Federal Census
  • 1810 Federal Census
  • 1820 Federal Census
  • 1830 Federal Census
  • 1840 Federal Census
  • 1850 Federal Census
  • 1860 Federal Census
  • 1870 Federal Census
  • 1880 Federal Census
  • 1880 Short Form
  • 1885 State Census – 5 states
  • 1890 Short Form
  • 1890 Veterans Schedule
  • 1900 Federal Census
  • 1910 Federal Census
  • 1920 Federal Census
  • 1930 Federal Census
  • 1940 Federal Census
  • 1950 Federal Census

Industry/Manufactures Schedules:

  • 1820 Manufactures
  • 1850 Products of Industry
  • 1860 Products of Industry
  • 1870 Products of Industry
  • 1880 Manufactures-Products of Industry
  • 1880 Manufactures-Boots, Shoes
  • 1880 Manufactures-Flour & Grist Mills
  • 1880 Manufactures-Lumber Mills
  • 1880 Manufactures-Agri. Implements
  • 1885 Manufactures Schedule

Agriculture Schedules:

  • 1850 Agriculture
  • 1860 Agriculture
  • 1870 Agriculture
  • 1880 Agriculture
  • 1885 Agriculture

Mortality Schedules:

  • 1850 Mortality Schedule
  • 1860 Mortality Schedule
  • 1870 Mortality Schedule
  • 1880 Mortality Schedule
  • 1885 Mortality Schedule

Slave Schedules:

  • 1850 Slave Schedule
  • 1860 Slave Schedule

Social Statistics Schedules:

  • 1850, 1860, 1870 Social Statistics
  • 1880 Defective, Dependent & Delinquent Classes:
  • 1880 Insane Inhabitants & Idiots
  • 1880 Deaf-Mutes & Blind Inhabitants
  • 1880 Homeless Children & Prisoners
  • 1880 Pauper & Indigent Inhabitants

Soundex Extraction Forms:
Soundex Indexes Description & Contents

  • 1880 Soundex
  • 1900 Soundex
  • 1910 Soundex/Miracode
  • 1920 Soundex
  • 1930 Soundex

Census Comparison Sheets:

  • 1790-1840 Census Worksheet
  • Census Comparisons Sheet

COMPARISON OF THE 1999 EDITION WITH THE 2019 EDITION OF THE CENSUS BOOK
In 1999, the first Census Book was published. The full title was The Census Book: A Genealogist’s Guide to Federal Census Facts, Schedules and Indexes, by William Dollarhide (Publ. Heritage Quest, Bountiful, Utah, 182 pages). The original Census Book has been out of print for several years, but is still cited frequently at many genealogical websites.

In 2019, an all new Census Book was published. The full title: The Census Book: Facts, Schedules & Worksheets for the U.S. Federal Censuses, by William Dollarhide (Publ. Family Roots Publishing Co., LLC, Orting, WA, 245 pages). The many references to CD-ROM publications were replaced with many more direct links to Internet databases. There are a total of 1,770 links to Internet websites, giving access to over one billion census records/names. The references to printed countywide census indexes were removed, replaced by links to census databases and substitute publications. Specific changes in each Section were as follows:

Comparison of Section 1 – Census Facts, Historical U.S. Censuses. The original concept and layout was enhanced with extensive editing and added features.

Comparison of Section 2 – Population Schedules. The 1999 edition had no references to the Internet for census population schedules – the 2019 edition has links to 630 websites, providing instant access to over 600 million indexed census records/names online. In the first Census Book, each census year had a table showing CD-ROM indexes and any printed book indexes available. In the new Census Book, a table for each census year now includes the starting FHL film roll number for each state’s population schedules, providing links to 580 FHL catalog webpages. It is the searchable roll number that gives a researcher quick access to the digital images of any census year, state, county, or town. Census substitutes were added where available; better U.S. maps of each census year were included; and 1940 and 1950 census chapters were added. Also, a new census chapter was inserted for 1885, when 14 states took state censuses – they are good substitutes for the lost 1890 census.

Comparison of Section 3 – Non-Population Schedules. This section identifies all non-population categories, adding those after 1900. All new statewide tables, Alabama to Wyoming, were expanded to 1935, and reorganized for appearance and adding URL links to 560 more online databases. The location of the original Non-Population schedules is given, and the locations of microfilm copies now features many direct links to a Family History Library online catalog webpage, in particular, those with digital images available.

Comparison of Section 4 – Census Samples & Worksheets. The 1999 Census Book had no Samples and 34 Census Worksheets; the new 2019 Census Book has 57 Samples and 42 Worksheets. New worksheets were added for the 1890 Short Form; the 1940 Census; and the 1820, 1850, 1860, 1870, 1880, and 1885 Manufactures Schedules.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR
William Dollarhide is best known as the co-author and cartographer of the classic Map Guide to the U.S.Federal Censuses, 1790-1920, a book of 393 census-year maps, and one of the best selling books ever published in the field of genealogy. He released the first edition of The Census Book in 1999, a book that is still cited frequently at many genealogical websites. He has also written numerous Censuses & Substitutes guidebooks for genealogical research; e.g., a 3-volume regional set; and a 52-volume set (for each U.S. state, DC, and U.S. Territories). His other works include New York State Censuses & Substitutes, referred to as “the definitive guide,” by the NY Genealogical & Biographical Society; Managing a Genealogical Project, a manual for organizing genealogical documents; Map Guide to American Migration Routes, 1735-1815, a review of the U.S. wagon roads in place before steam engines; and Genealogical Resources of the Civil War Era, a review of Military and Civilian name lists; and several other publications.

REVIEWS
“Bill Dollarhide is the authority on U.S. federal censuses. The first edition of The Census Book was the bellwether for census research and has remained the go-to reference. The new edition is updated to include Internet resources and contains a wealth of insightful information, graphics of the schedules, and essential worksheets to help your federal census analyses. This book should be on every genealogist’s bookshelf and in every genealogical library collection. Bravo!” – George G. Morgan, co-host of The Genealogy Guys Podcast, lecturer, and genealogy writer.

Following are a few pages from “Inside the Book” (Click on the links, then on the thumbnail image to view the PDF page):

The Census Book – Page 9 The Growth of the US Census – RS
The Census Book – Page 25 Co Boundary & Statistics – RS
The Census Book – Page 26 Co Boundaries & Statistics – RS
The Census Book – Page 39 1810 Census – RS
The Census Book – Page 108 Non-Population_Schedules_Table – RS
The Census Book – Page 109 Non-population Schedules Description – RS
The Census Book – Page 128 Michigan Non-population Schedules – RS
The Census Book – Page 147 Census Samples and Forms_Contents – RS

The Census Book: Facts, Schedules & Worksheets for the U.S. Federal Censuses; William Dollarhide, 2019, 245 pages; Color printing throughout; Tables; Website links – Click on the following links to order:

Again, FRPC is offering currently offering The Census Book at 25% off and includes a free immediately downloadable PDF eBook version of the soft and hardcover books. Offer ends December 2, 2020. Click on the links to order – and get yours today!

Substitutes for the Lost 1890 U.S. Federal Census – 25% Off With Free PDF eBook Thru Dec. 2, 2020

2020. november 27., péntek 0:02:37

Substitutes for the Lost 1890 U.S. Federal Census is the first comprehensive guide to substitutes for the lost 1890 U.S. Federal Census ever compiled. Written by researcher and author, William Dollarhide, this volume pulls together a listing of mostly online and quickly accessible sources to overcome the hurdle of the “gap” between the 1880 and 1910 U.S. Federal Censuses.

The book is on sale for 25% off at the Family Roots Publishing website. MSRP is $19.46, but is 25% off if you purchase now at the website. In addition, we will add an immediate free PDF eBook download and it’s only $19.46! You may also purchase the eBook alone for the same discount, making it only $12.71! Offer good through Dec. 2, 2020.

All 1,203 database source titles listed in this book were extracted from the series of state books, Censuses & Substitute Name Lists. The sources identified are in the form of databases mostly found on the Internet. This volume adds the number of records covering the years 1885-1895 into the description of each database whenever possible, making the guide invaluable to the researcher. Any substitute name lists not digitized yet are noted with a link a reference to a state book wherein more information is available.

Substitutes for the Lost 1890 U.S. Federal Census; by William Dollarhide, 2019; 101 pp; 8.5×11; softbound; ISBN: 978-1-62895-245-2; Item #: FR0426

National Name Lists. 65 major U.S. databases identified in the National Name Lists section came from one of the following categories:

National Vital Records Lists. Includes major databases such as burials, obituary listings, and birth, marriage, and death records from multiple states.

Immigration Lists. Includes records of ships manifests, customs reports, and lists of aliens arriving at U.S. ports of call.

U.S. Military Lists. Includes rosters of soldiers, sailors, and Marines; and draft registrations.

Veterans and Pensioners Lists. Includes databases from national organizations, and U.S. Pension Lists.

State Name Lists – 1,138 statewide databases in the State Name Lists section came from one of the following categories:

State & Territory Census Records. Between 1884 and 1896, thirty-two censuses were conducted by twenty different states/territories, all separate from the federal censuses They were taken for the years 1884 (1), 1885 (14), 1890 (3), 1891 (1), 1892 (1), 1894 (1), 1895 (10), and 1896 (1). See Table 1 (page 2) for the list of states/territories involved.

State and County Court Records. Includes naturalizations, probates, estates, wills, and real estate records, in particular, those with a substantial number of records dated 1885-1895.

Directories. For the period 1885-1895, city/county directories provide a good substitute for the lost 1890 census. The basic name/date/place elements are always recorded in a directory.

State Militia Lists. Includes rosters of soldiers at the regimental level, those having a substantial number of records dated 1885-1895.

Tax Lists. Includes name/date/place lists for an entire state, or for larger counties within a state, and covering the period 1885-1895.

Vital Records. Lists of statewide births, marriages, divorces, obituaries, deaths, and burials are included in the State Name Lists section, those with a large number of 1885-1895 events.

Substitutes for the Lost 1890 U.S. Federal Census; by William Dollarhide, 2019; 101 pp; 8.5×11; softbound; ISBN: 978-1-62895-245-2; Item #: FR0426

NEW: Tracing Your Ancestors: Eastern European Research, A Practical Guide – 20% Off Thru December 2

2020. november 26., csütörtök 2:28:21

FRPC recently got a good stock of the new Tracing Your Ancestors: Eastern European Research, A Practical Guide, and we’re adding them to our Sale at 20% off thru December 2. Following is a description of the item. Click on the links or illustration to order.

Tracing Your Ancestors: Eastern European Research, A Practical Guide; by Lisa A. Alzo and Dave Obee; 2020; 66 pp; soft cover; saddle-stapled; ISBN 978-1-926510-13-2; Item #: MM033

Written by Eastern European research experts, Lisa Alzo and Dave Obee, this new guide to Eastern European research covers topics I’ve not seen written about previously, and updates and reviews some old ones. The following is from the Table of Contents:

  • Researching Here and Over There – Tips for tracing your Eastern European roots from both sides of the ocean
  • The Sources You Might Be Missing – Resources for Eastern European genealogists that often fly under the radar
  • Using FamilySearch – We look at what’s new and updated in collections available at FamilySearch with Greg Nelson
  • Sorting Out Surnames – Understanding the meanings, suffixes, and variations of Eastern European surnames
  • Ten Most Useful Databases – The best places to find online records for Eastern European ancestors
  • Eastern European Places names – “Where is that?” Four steps you should take for determining Eastern European place names
  • Researching Volhynia – Dave Obee looks at the history and genealogical resources for this almost-forgotten German colony
  • Austria-Hungarian Research – A Collection of 17 sites for researching ancestors in Austria and Hungary
  • Census Research – How to locate Eastern European enumeration and population schedules
  • Beginning Baltics Research – Tips and resources for tracing ancestors in Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania
  • Translation Tools – A look at some of the best tools to help you work with Eastern European documents
  • Poland, Ukraine & Galicia – A look at 15 top resources you will want to Explore
  • Ten Eastern European Societies – We show you how ethnic genealogical societies can further your research!

NEW: Genealogy at a Glance: Mexico Genealogy Research – 20% Off Through December 2

2020. november 26., csütörtök 2:22:30

The latest Genealogy at a glance is Mexico Genealogy Research, by Debbie Gurtler, AG. FRPC has a good stock of the product and making it available at 10% off thru Dec. 2. See the following description. Click on the illustration or the links to order.

Genealogy at a Glance: Mexico Genealogy Research; Debbie Gurtler; 2020; 4 pp., folded & Laminated; ISBN: 9780806321097; Item #: GPC2425

Mexico obtained its independence from Spain in 1821. Before that date, the area under Spanish rule was huge and included much of the southern United States, from Louisiana to the west coast of California. Therefore, many people in the United States can trace their ancestry back to Mexico. This four-page, laminated guide will give you the solid foundation needed to start tracing your Mexican ancestors.

It begins with a discussion of Hispanic naming traditions and how they offer valuable clues for your family history research. Then, after a brief jurisdictional history of Mexico, the major record sources are described—civil registration records, Catholic parish records, census records, and immigration records. Some useful supplementary record sources, language aides, and a list of online resources are also included.

In other words, Genealogy at a Glance: Mexican Genealogy Research lays out all the basic elements of Mexican family history research in an easy-to-use format, allowing researchers to grasp the fundamentals of Mexican genealogy at a glance.